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A brand spanking new version of Windows IoT is here!

The latest build is here! Follow the detailed steps in this blog to get it on your Pi!

I just saw a tweet about a new version of Windows IoT being released, and promptly downloaded it and installed it. The process has become a whole lot easier than last time round. Here is what you need to do to get it on your Raspberry Pi2:

First, head over to https://dev.windows.com/en-us/iot. You will want to click on Downloads

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Then click here to get the Pi 2 download:

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Once downloaded, you should find an ISO file in your downloads folder, which you will need to Mount.

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After mounting the ISO, you will see a new DVD drive, on which is an MSI file you can run to install the IOT tools…

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When the installer has completed, head over to your Program Files (x86) and you should find a Microsoft IoT folder. In it is a folder FFU that contains the flash image of the Windows IoT OS for your SD Card. I got a SanDisk 16 Gb card, you will need to pop your card into your card reader if you can find it…mine was cunningly hidden here. You may need to put the micro card inside a bigger sleeve, or use an external card reader.

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In your Microsoft IoT folder is a program “IotCoreImageHelper.exe” that will help you write that FFU to the card

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Run it! This beautiful UI shows up, where you can select your SD card, and your FFU file, then hit Flash. The FFU file is down from the Microsoft IoT folder, under FFU/RaspberryPi2.

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As the flashing progresses you will see something like this, then a message saying it is done

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A new Explorer windows will pop up showing the contents of this newly created drive. You can ignore this: close it, close the Flash program, and safely eject your SD card.

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Now, hear over to your Raspberry Pi 2, insert the SD Card, and plug in your USB power cable! Below you can see where the card goes, and you will see some lights come on.

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The Pi takes a little while to boot. In the mean time, make sure you have plugged in an Ethernet cable into your Pi (I actually use a little Wifi to Ethernet gadget to bridge the Pi onto the local WiFi that my laptop is on, available here)

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In the same folder as you FFU imaging tool, you will find the IoT core watcher:

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Run this app, and after clicking Refresh a few times, you should see your  Pi come online…

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Take a note of the IP address (above my DHCP server gave it 192.168.1.48), you will need it soon. Also, see that the device is called minwinpc. We can change that name in a few.

Once you can see the device on the network, we need to head over to PowerShell to connect to it and do some basic configuration. There is a good step by step guide here, just follow it:

https://ms-iot.github.io/content/en-US/win10/samples/PowerShell.htm

Here is what my experience looked like, up to where I log in. Note how the IP address from above is in play a few times. The initial credentials are Administrator, p@ssw0rd, you will definitely want to change that as detailed in the step by step guide.

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Here you can see me changing the password (redacted), the machine name (to WinIotPi2), and then rebooting

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After the reboot you will see the machine come back with it’s new name:

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You can now use Power Shell to connect again, with the new name and your new password, and you are off to the races. Enjoy!

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Upgrading to RTM

02 August 2015, 01:01 PM

[…] you have Visual Studio RTM installed, you basically go through all the same steps as detailed in my previous blog, except doing it with the new binaries. You will be flashing a new RPi image, which contains an […]

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